Winemaking. Life. The Dirt. Alison Crowe is a Winemaker Based in Napa.

The Sky is Falling? Wine Country Wants More of This Wet Stuff

wet feet

Who’s afraid of wet feet? Grapevines are resilient plants and can handle standing water for weeks at a time. The recent rains in Northern California have had a positive effect on local reservoirs and water tables.

 

For the last couple of weeks I’ve had a lot of friends express their concern about the recent Northern California storms.  Alarmed about images they’ve seen on the news of vineyards up to their elbows in water, they query, “On top of the earthquake, now you’ve got to deal with flooded vineyards?  Can’t you guys in Napa ever catch a break?”

 

 

What they don’t know is that this December rain is just the break- the break in the historical drought- that we’ve been looking for.

This Harvest many of us were in a state of quiet panic.  One more dry winter and ponds and reservoirs wouldn’t have enough water for frost protection during bud break.  There would be precious little natural water in the ground for the vines to sip and many would go thirsty as the heat of summer parched developing leaves and clusters.  In a Harvest heat spike, crop-saving water wouldn’t be available from wells or vineyard ponds to prevent grapes from turning to raisins on the vine.  In short, without rain this winter we would be facing  a very dire situation.  Winter 2015 would be make or break.

It looks like (fingers crossed), in the short term at least, we are getting just what we need.  Many areas in Northern California are close to average rainfall totals for this time of year and it’s only December.  The overall picture of the drought Statewide is improving, especially in areas north of Santa Barbara County.  Recent reports show the likelihood of the next three months being nice and wet.

We're keeping an eye on rushing creeks and on erosion-prone slopes but so far everything is holding out- and holding on- well.

We’re keeping an eye on rushing creeks and on erosion-prone slopes but so far everything is holding out- and holding on- well.

We are not, however, out of this historic drought yet.  If we don’t get enough water frozen into our Sierra Nevada snowpack “reservoir”,  it’s possible that a wet 2015 will simply kick the can down the road and we’ll be quietly panicking again come the 2015 Harvest season. These storms need to deposit quite a bit of snow in the Sierra as well as significant precipitation in Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties to make me feel better about my vineyards on the Central Coast.

In the meantime, don’t worry about my little grapes getting wet up in Napa. As fellow Nap-kin Dan Berger recently explained, vines can survive “wet feet”, even for an extended period of time.  Sure, the rain has caused and is causing small amounts of localized flooding and the odd new grapevine replant or two will end up in a culvert. We’re continuing to watch pockets of erosion-prone slopes and are taking care not to run the tractors into the mud bogs.

Wet vines?  John Deere up to his axles in mud?  So much water in our ponds that the reservoirs spill over? All of my wine making and grape growing buddies and I, North and South, near and far, have just two words on our minds and on the tips of our tongues:  “Bring it”.

 

 

Alison Crowe is an award-winning winemaker, author and blogger living in Napa, CA.  She is the Winemaker for Garnet Vineyards among other consulting projects and is the author of The Winemaker’s Answer Book.  Started in 2013, www.girlandthegrape.com won “Best New Wine Blog” in the 2014 Wine Blog Awards.  When she has time, she plays tennis, cooks for friends and family, writes the occasional wine article and does a daily rain dance.

contact:  ancrowe@hotmail.com  Twitter:  @alisoncrowewine  LinkedIn:  Alison Crowe 

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