Winemaking. Life. The Dirt. Alison Crowe is a Winemaker Based in Napa.

Advice to an Intern: 10 things Winemakers want you to know

 

A winery during crush is a wet, cold, slippery and sometimes dangerous place.  Winemakers share their tips for getting through Harvest.

A winery during crush is a wet, cold, slippery and sometimes dangerous place. Winemakers share their tips for getting through Harvest.

The other day I got an email from a reader who was about to embark on her first harvest as a winemaking intern.  She wondered if I had any tips or advice for her.  She had a good pair of boots but what else would she need?  What should she be worried about or watch out for?

I had my own list but in order to really “get the goods” decided to do a little crowd-sourcing for this gal who was interested enough to contact me.  I pointed the Bat-Signal into the Facebook universe and in return received a quickly-growing thread of “advice to an intern” from fellow winemakers.

Do we have advice for her?  Do we ever.  The wine industry has a grand tradition of taking the up-and-coming generation under our wings and besides getting them wet and tired, perhaps teaching them a few things along the way.  It was hard to whittle the list down to 10 in order to keep this post manageable and I can see this one being the first of many.

One of my best Pinot Noir mentors, the late great Don Blackburn, had a sign on his office door that read “Winemaking Begins With People.”  It’s a mantra that rings as true for me today as the day I first read it while walking into a job interview.  He was a tough taskmaster and required prompt start times, spotless buckets and shining pruning shears from the intern team (yes, I got the job) but we had a great time and learned a lot too.

Without further ado, here are 10 bits of “advice to an intern,” direct from Winemakers who’ve been there:

Glenn Alexander, Sanglier Cellars

“Get the best, most comfortable pair of waterproof boots you can afford.”

 

Tom Collins, UC Davis Department of Viticulture & Enology

“Always have a change of clothing in your car because cold and wet is a hard way to drive home.”

 

Brooke Langelius, St. Supery:

“Bring lots of food for backup on long days!”

 

Marty Johnson, Eaton Hill Winery and Ruby Magdalena Vineyards:

“Beer.  Bring lots and lots of beer for sharing with everyone after cleanup.  We all know it takes a lot of good beer to make wine.”

 

Ed Kurtzman, August West Wines, Freeman Winery:

“Don’t make outside plans during Harvest that you can’t get out of.”

 

Amy J. Butler, Ranchero Cellars

“Ask questions!  The sorting table is a good place to entrap your Winemaker into teaching you stuff.”

 

Elizabeth Vianna, Chimney Rock Winery

“Get to know the cellar crew.  They can be some of the best teachers.”

 

Chris Kajani, Saintsbury Winery:

“Be early.  And preferably not hung over.”

 

Cynthia Cosco, Passaggio Wines

“Learn lots…have fun…make connections….safety first!”

 

Domenica Totty, Beaulieu Vineyard

“Have fun and make as many connections as you can – other interns, winemakers, anyone working harvest.
And, it’s ok to show up with a hangover… But you’d better be on time & work your butt off in spite of it!”

 

Alison Crowe is a winemaker based in Napa, California and fondly remembers her first harvests as an intern at Chalone Vineyard and Byington Winery & Vineyard.  She makes wine at Garnet Vineyards and can be reached at ancrowe@hotmail.com and on Twitter:  @alisoncrowewine .  She wishes the best of luck to all the new harvest interns out there- it’s a wild ride but welcome aboard!

 

 

 

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