Winemaking. Life. The Dirt. Alison Crowe is a Winemaker Based in Napa.

Bloom: The secret scent of vineyards

Pinot in bloom- Stanly Ranch, Carneros

Pinot in bloom- Stanly Ranch, Carneros

What does a vineyard smell like?  If you’re fortunate enough to be around vineyards in the middle of Spring, you might find out if you can catch the vines when they’re in the midst of  that fleeting week or two called “Bloom.”  This is when the developing grape clusters actually flower, get fertilized and begin their true journey to become this harvest’s grape crop.

 

Tiny flower

One tiny flower has started to appear on this soon-to-be grape cluster

 

 

Some express surprise that grapes actually flower.  It’s not perhaps the most glamorous part of the wine year, and certainly never seems to get much attention in the media.  Indeed, it is probably one of the quietest times of the growing season.  The pruning crews are long gone and the tractors have done most of their post-winter tilling.  The danger of frost season is largely over.  Harvest is still many long months away and winemakers have their heads buried deep in their barrel stacks and their bottling lines.   Attention is focused elsewhere.

 

In the meantime, screens of vine leaves obscure the drama quietly unfolding underneath. Push aside a saucer-sized leaf and you’ll reveal a thumb’s length of yellow-green nubs, each crowned with a tuft of cream-colored threads.  Carefully wave away the drowsing bumblebee and bury your nose in the soft texture of the developing grape cluster.  Inhale.  Until the grapes are crushed and fermentation begins, this is the only time you’ll be able to immerse yourself in the scent of a grape.

bloom

Flower petals look like tiny cream-colored threads atop what will eventually become each individual grape berry.

 

So what does a vineyard smell like?  Stanly Ranch Pinot Noir, at 10:01 in the morning on May 1, 2014 smelled like the skin of a sun-warmed D’Anjou pear, the flesh of a fuji apple and a slice of a barely-ripe honeydew melon.

The aroma of a blooming grape cluster is sweet without being cloying and like the scent of violets, is ephemeral and doesn’t satiate. It’s impossible to stop sniffing because the aroma of Bloom, like the time of the year itself, is subtle, beautiful and fleeting.

 

 

 

 

Alison Crowe is the Winemaker at Garnet Vineyards and is fascinated by the world of scent and loves how aromas stir our memories and touch our souls.

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Copyright Alison Crowe 2014

 

 

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2 Comments

  1. Luckily the hail last week happened before bloom really began- was spotty, short and scattered. You’re right, it’s all about timing! We hope we have no hail in the next two weeks!

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