Winemaking. Life. The Dirt. Alison Crowe is a Winemaker Based in Napa.

Archives: The Grapegrowing Year

Three Surprising Things About Harvest 2014 and What it Means for Wine Quality

At Garnet Vineyards we celebrated a record early Harvest by toasting Stanly Ranch Pinot Noir in late August.

At Garnet Vineyards we celebrated a record early Harvest by toasting Stanly Ranch Pinot Noir in late August. (Winemaker Alison Crowe- that’s me- on the left, Assistant Winemaker Barbara on the right)

In addition to making Pinot Noir and Chardonnay for Garnet Vineyards, I consult for a wide array of wineries and brands around the state of California. Every Harvest I crush quite a few tons for my clients and work out of a number of wineries from Napa to Sonoma to the Central Coast. You could say I get around. What that means is, aside from seeing some beautiful scenery and getting to work with a lot of wonderful people, I get a pretty good view of what happens across the state during Harvest.

You’ve probably already heard the chatter: “Early.” “Fast.” “High Quality” (the latter the standard rote from all of the regional vintners’ associations.) However, you may not have heard all that I did as I traveled, worked and shared the occasional beer with my grape-growing and winemaking colleagues during this fast and furious crush season. Below are some lesser-known bits of winemaking insight and what they might mean for the developing wines of Harvest 2014.

Russian River Chardonnay remained tight and firm and was about two weeks later than normal.

Russian River Chardonnay remained tight and firm and was about two weeks later than normal.

Harvest wasn’t early everywhere or for every varietal

In the North Coast, where I live and where my operations are based, Chardonnay was actually quite late. I got into the bulk of my Russian River Chardonnay only after I started pulling in Alexander Valley Cab, which in ten years of working with my current slate of vineyards has never happened. On the Central Coast last week I had friends that were still waiting for some Zins and Carignane to ripen, which is odd for their relatively warm Paso Robles climate. Here in Napa, one of my Oak Knoll Cabernet vineyards which is typically among the first to come in was one of my last this year, as I waited longer than anticipated for the flavors to really “pop”.

The consequences of this atypical ripening pattern were largely twofold. First, wineries had a bit of a tough time pressing finished red fermentations while pressing incoming whites. Unless you have multiple presses (or want rose wine) you have to carefully clean red skins from the press before loading in white grapes. This, coupled with cellars already crowded with wine from the bountiful 2012 and 2013 vintages made for tight quarters, long hours and frazzled nerves. So far from what I’ve seen, wineries pulled off miracles but it makes me wonder if all winemakers got their fruit processed exactly when they desired. Secondly, the flip-flopped ripening order made 2014 a year where, especially, you had to be in the vineyard early and often to determine the perfect “pick window”.  This Harvest’s ideal moment for picking any given block was unpredictable and it’s likely that winemakers who just relied on Brix reports (and didn’t even visit the vineyard until sugars hit 25.0)  missed it.

Color, flavor and tannins were in perfect balance two-three weeks earlier than normal, especially for Pinot Noir and Merlot.

Color, flavor and tannins were in perfect balance two-three weeks earlier than normal, especially for Pinot Noir and Merlot.

2014 could be the perfect “low alcohol” year for some reds

Looking for “lower alcohol” red wines that might clock in at 13.0% rather than more typical levels above 14.50% alcohol? 2014 might be a year to watch from your favorite producers, especially those who make Pinot Noir as well as Napa and Alexander Valley Merlots. These varietals came in from my vineyards up north and on the Central Coast at record early dates and most had reached full flavor and tannin maturity at brixes well under 25.0. Pyrazines (a dreaded “bell pepper” aroma indicative of unripe Cabernet and Merlot) even disappeared early, further indicating a high-quality, lower-brix pick date. I attribute all this to the warm, largely frost-free growing season we had on the North and Central Coasts as well as some propitious late winter rains that helped keep soil profiles relatively full except in the driest spots. Stanly Ranch Carneros Pinot Noir at 23.8 Brix on August 28th?  Flavors were there, the balance was there, and tannins were ripe so I ignored the calendar and picked it. Based on what I just tasted in barrel yesterday, another year from now I know I’ll still be glad that I did.

The grapes are off the vines.  Time to bring on the rain.

The grapes are off the vines. Time to bring on the rain.

Mid-October rains are not worrying winemakers (for once)

A major mid-October rainstorm in Northern California would normally be call for alarm during any typical Harvest season. Instead of worrying winemakers in what would usually be the height of the picking panic, the high probability of a few wet days this week is being welcomed by almost everyone I know. Unlike most years, just about every grape is in the barn, happily fermenting away, or just scooting in before tonight’s predicted raindrops are slated to start falling. Like “noble rot” dessert wines, those which get their concentrated sugars and distinctive, luscious flavors from indigenous vineyard molds? This extra moisture will surely encourage the growth of Botrytis cinerea and wines from producers like Napa’s Oro Puro and Foley Johnson should be especially fabulous from the 2014 season.

So believe the hype. Harvest 2014 was early (mostly). It was also fast, unless you’re still hanging your Semillon waiting for Botrytis to cover your clusters with a fuzzy grey blanket. And yes, you can believe the vintners’ associations too. I don’t know how we got off so easily, but statewide, Mother Nature blessed us with a flavorful, colorful, high quality Harvest- for a third time in a row.  Now let’s just hope she comes through with a really wet winter.

Alison Crowe is a winemaker based in Napa and can be reached at ancrowe@hotmail.com and at LinkedIn.

Copyright Alison Crowe 2014.

Bloom: The secret scent of vineyards

Pinot in bloom- Stanly Ranch, Carneros

Pinot in bloom- Stanly Ranch, Carneros

What does a vineyard smell like?  If you’re fortunate enough to be around vineyards in the middle of Spring, you might find out if you can catch the vines when they’re in the midst of  that fleeting week or two called “Bloom.”  This is when the developing grape clusters actually flower, get fertilized and begin their true journey to become this harvest’s grape crop.

 

Tiny flower

One tiny flower has started to appear on this soon-to-be grape cluster

 

 

Some express surprise that grapes actually flower.  It’s not perhaps the most glamorous part of the wine year, and certainly never seems to get much attention in the media.  Indeed, it is probably one of the quietest times of the growing season.  The pruning crews are long gone and the tractors have done most of their post-winter tilling.  The danger of frost season is largely over.  Harvest is still many long months away and winemakers have their heads buried deep in their barrel stacks and their bottling lines.   Attention is focused elsewhere.

 

In the meantime, screens of vine leaves obscure the drama quietly unfolding underneath. Push aside a saucer-sized leaf and you’ll reveal a thumb’s length of yellow-green nubs, each crowned with a tuft of cream-colored threads.  Carefully wave away the drowsing bumblebee and bury your nose in the soft texture of the developing grape cluster.  Inhale.  Until the grapes are crushed and fermentation begins, this is the only time you’ll be able to immerse yourself in the scent of a grape.

bloom

Flower petals look like tiny cream-colored threads atop what will eventually become each individual grape berry.

 

So what does a vineyard smell like?  Stanly Ranch Pinot Noir, at 10:01 in the morning on May 1, 2014 smelled like the skin of a sun-warmed D’Anjou pear, the flesh of a fuji apple and a slice of a barely-ripe honeydew melon.

The aroma of a blooming grape cluster is sweet without being cloying and like the scent of violets, is ephemeral and doesn’t satiate. It’s impossible to stop sniffing because the aroma of Bloom, like the time of the year itself, is subtle, beautiful and fleeting.

 

 

 

 

Alison Crowe is the Winemaker at Garnet Vineyards and is fascinated by the world of scent and loves how aromas stir our memories and touch our souls.

Facebook:  www.Facebook.com/GarnetVineyards    Twitter:  @GarnetVineyards

Like this blog?  Nominate me for “Best Winery Blog” in the 2014 Wine Blog Awards!

Copyright Alison Crowe 2014

 

 

Breaking Bud: The Bad Side of a Nice Season

Arrrgh!  The joys (the mustard!) and the heartbreak (the frost danger!) of the "Budbreak" season

Arrrgh! The joys (the mustard!) and the heartbreak (the frost danger!) of the “Budbreak” season

Just like TV’s favorite good guy/bad guy Walter White, there’s a lot of positive and negative about the season we call “bud break.”  On one hand, it’s an exciting and exhilarating time when our vines wake up and the buds start pushing out the shoots which will turn into this Harvest’s grapes.

Poppies!

Poppies!

 

                 There are gorgeous sights to be had out in the field:  stands of poppies, rows of mustard, velvety cover crops and of course, the stars of the show, our developing grape canopy and clusters. 

On the other hand, there are some potentially not-so-beautiful experiences to be had:  frost, continued drought, or even maybe crop-damaging hail.  It’s a stressful time where we worry about how cold those nights will get or how much (or how little!) rainfall will manifest as the days creep by into late spring when warmer night temperatures take away a lot of the worry.

Though we’d like to see more storms and rain during this early growing season (we need it!), the main concern is frost, especially given the 2014  bud break which is tracking a week or two ahead of average. 

Cloudy skies have kept killing frost at bay...for now.

Cloudy skies have kept killing frost at bay…for now.

What that means is that there are potentially two weeks’ more of nights where we could experience frost and subsequent damage to the emerging buds, resulting in stunted green growth and lost crop.  Based on bud counts, shoot counts and just because I don’t think Mother Nature can hand us three bumper crops in a row, 2014 isn’t shaping up to be a big harvest season to begin with.  Adding insult to injury, we are still in water-challenged conditions in California, which means that there could be little (and in some areas, no) access to extra water for frost protection (using sprinklers in cold conditions counter-intuitively can prevent buds from freezing). 

The weather forecast is looking great- let's let it hang!

Next week’s weather should look like this- pretty for taking vineyard pictures but clear skies mean more frost potential.

   So far, the Napa and Sonoma frost forecast into next week looks pretty good and continued cloud cover and rainy weather will keep nighttime temperatures above freezing.  As we clear up into next week, however, those clear night skies mean colder temperatures could set in even as we get sunnier and warmer days.  Cue the AMC (and the wind machines), grab some popcorn and a glass of Pinot Noir and be prepared for some “Breaking Bad”-style Jekyll and Hyde behavior.  It’s always exciting to be in the vineyard in the springtime but we could be in for some cold criminal action! 

Grab a glass of Pinot, it could be a wild frost season!

Grab a glass of Pinot, it could be a wild frost season!

Alison Crowe is the winemaker at Garnet Vineyards and is keeping tabs on vineyards in Carneros, Russian River, Sonoma Coast and Monterey appelations.  Follow her on Twitter @GarnetVineyards or on facebook.com/GarnetVineyards for the latest on the developing season!