Winemaking. Life. The Dirt. Alison Crowe is a Winemaker Based in Napa.

For My SoCal Friends: Lessons I learned from the Wine Country Wildfires

Day 2 The "Burnt Toast BnB" Crew surviving- with masks on. L to Right, John Egerman, Alison Crowe, Sandy Crowe, Jennifer Crowe

The Wine Country Wildfire “Burnt Toast BnB” Crew surviving- with masks on. L to Right, John Egerman, Alison Crowe, my mom Sandy Crowe and sister Jennifer Crowe. Wearing our “N95” anti-smoke masks!

My parents were just up here in Napa helping Chris and I prepare to evacuate during the October Wine Country Wildfires and now they are facing a similar situation at home.  As the Thomas Fire creeps closer to Carpinteria, California, the idyllic little beach town where I grew up, my heart goes out to all my friends and family in the area.

There’s not much I can do from hundreds of miles away, besides post current fire maps on Facebook and try to be a communication bridge from afar.  However, I can at least compile a list of lessons and “to do’s” I learned during the Wine Country Wildfires of October 2017.

 

If you have to evacuate soon, like in the next few hours: 

-Make a list of “To Do’s” and “To Pack’s”.  Stress makes for forgetful minds and writing it down will add to your sanity and calm.

-Know your escape routes and keep posted on if and when they might get pinched off.  Have a backup escape plan (or two).

-Pre-arrange a rendezvous point out of the area post-evacuation in case you get separated on the drive away from your house (if you’re taking more than one vehicle).  That way you’ll know immediately if everyone made it out OK.

-If you haven’t already, sign up for local alert systems like Nixle.

-Turn on local radio channels.  We listened to Napa’s KVYN 99.3 a lot.

-Be wary of false or rumored information on social media.  Do verbal or messaging check ins with people to confirm information.

-Find all your animals immediately.  So many people got delayed chasing down scared cats or dogs.

-Evacuate little kids early if possible, as early as possible.  It will be far less traumatic for them watching from Grandma’s than seeing your scared faces and listening to the stressful grownup conversations.

-“Fireproof” safes are not.

-If you don’t have time to pack a suitcase, grab your dirty laundry basket.  At least it will be full of items you’ve recently worn (seasonal and will fit) and you can always visit a laundromat or wash clothes at a friend’s house.  (thanks for the tip, Julie Schreiber!)

-If you choose to wear a mask or respirator (highly recommended) make sure it’s labeled “NIOSH-Approved” or marked “N95” or “P100”.  Simple dust masks only trap large particles and the smaller smoke particles can still damage your lungs.

-Open your garage doors.  In the event of a power outage, it’s difficult to open electric garage doors.

-Pack essentials….and only the essentials.  Do the critical stuff first (passports, clothes, medicine, phones, chargers, batteries, food, water, pets and pet food) and then pack up some extra boxes later only if you have time (like your jewelry box, the wedding silver etc).  This is where a prioritized “To Do” list is important.

-Be prepared for the power to go out at any time.

-Snap pictures of every room in your house and anything valuable in the yard or outbuildings for insurance purposes.

-Remember that vineyards, orchards and green space make great firebreaks.

– If you have well-irrigated fields, orchards, or  vineyards, consider moving cars, boats or RV’s into the middle if you can’t evacuate all of your vehicles.  This saved a lot of vehicles during the wine country fires.

-If it’s coming soon and there’s nothing you can do, turn on the irrigation.  Green lawns and plants will help keep fire away from the house.

-If you have a pool and a pump, you’ve got a great source of water to irrigate your roof and property.

-Turn off your gas when you leave.

 

If you think you might have to evacuate in the next day or two: 

-Prepare as early as possible.

-Pack an “immediate” go bag and keep it by your front door.

-Take out cash, preferably in smaller bills, and keep some in your cars and in your “go” bag.

-Fill all vehicle gas tanks.

-Park your vehicles with the nose pointed out.

-Put a flashlight in all vehicles in case you have to evacuate at night.

-Know how to open your garage doors in the absence of electricity.  Normally there is a hand-pull mechanism.  I’m constantly surprised at the number of times I heard that people had delays getting out because they couldn’t get their garage doors open.

-Sleep with shoes beside your bed in case you have to get out fast in the middle of the night.

-Keep a flashlight with fresh batteries by your bed.

-Save key electronic documents to the cloud in case you don’t have time to pack your computer.

-Move all woodpiles, wooden patio furniture or other moveable burnables away from the house.

-Be careful and watch for announcements- you may have to boil your water if power goes down and water treatment plants are not able to operate.

-Clean out your gutters

-Put sprinklers on your roof.

-If you have a pool, go and find a “Billy Pump” water pump like this if you don’t have one already.  Get one soon; they’ll go fast at Home Depot and Wal Mart.

-Get out your earthquake/disaster kit, go through it, make sure your supplies are fresh and current.  Shop for items you need to replace.

-If you have time, pack up some sentimental boxes of things you know you’d miss if your house burned down.  We packed original artwork, kids art projects, antiques and other irreplaceable family heirlooms.

 

If you don’t think you have to evacuate but are dealing with severe smoke in the area: 

-Be a good neighbor and open your home to evacuees.  We did and John (see picture above) was a tremendous help during the two weeks of fires here in Napa.

-If you have the space, offer up your driveway or property for boat or RV storage for evacuees.

-Volunteer at the Red Cross, Salvation Army or shelter.

-Buy air filters and masks as early as you can; they will quickly run out at area stores.  Have out of town friends bring them if they come to help, order them from Amazon if you can still get delivery to your house.

-Keep windows closed.

-Invest in a portable USB battery so you can charge your phone if the power goes out.

-You may think the fire won’t come your way; act like it will.

 

Alison Crowe is the Director of Winemaking for Plata Wine Partners in Napa, California and grew up in Carpinteria, California.  She is the winemaker for Garnet Vineyards and Picket Fence Vineyards in addition to other brands and projects.  She can be reached at ancrowe@hotmail.com.  Twitter and Instagram:  @alisoncrowewine

 

 

 

Give a Happy Thanksgiving to Wine Country Fire Survivors

Thanksgiving plateIt’s been exactly a month since the Wine Country/North Bay Wildfires were raging at their height across much of Northern California.  Since then, Harvest has ended, the air has cleared, schools and roads are open once again and life is slowly (very slowly) returning to “normal” for most families.

 

For some, however, “normal” won’t happen anytime soon.  As I make my own lists for organizing my family’s Thanksgiving in Napa, I couldn’t help but round up another one:  a list of organizations to which you can donate your money, time or wine in order to help someone affected by the fires.  Let’s help everyone to have a happier Thanksgiving.

 

Sonoma Family MealSonoma Family Meal: They Need Monetary Donations

Sonoma Family Meal is a grass-roots organization that sprung up during the fires, bringing together a coalition of chefs, hospitality, and culinary workers who desperately wanted to help those in need.  Since October 15, Sonoma Family Meal has prepared and distributed over 50,000 meals to North Bay Area residents free of charge.  A number of my good friends in the “cheffing” community are involved in this important and effective project.  They need your financial help to put Thanksgiving on the table for needy local families.  Click here to donate.

 

RedwoodRedwood Gospel Mission Great Thanksgiving Banquet: Donate and Volunteer

The Redwood Gospel Mission is holding a giant, free Thanksgiving dinner at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa on Weds Nov 22 11 AM-7:00 PM.  there will also be free haircuts, showers, a bouncy house and all-around family community.  You can volunteer your time, donate or, if you are a fire victim, register to receive a free turkey and family food box at the above link.

 

CANVCommunity Action of Napa Valley/Napa Food Bank: Donate

CANV/Napa Food Bank is Napa Valley’s main food bank organization and they are always in need of extra funds during the busy holiday season.  By clicking the link above you can put your money towards the food bank or “where it is needed most”.

 

 

CommunitySonoma Community Center Free Thanksgiving Dinner:  Volunteer your time

The Sonoma Community Center will host its annual Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday, Nov 23 and this year they expect more people than ever to come.  Please consider volunteering your time to help serve.  This year’s dinner is brought to you by the Rotary of Sonoma Valley, cheesemaker Gary Edwards, and chef Daniel Quijada.

 

 

 

ChefsgivingChefsGiving: Help house the displaced by eating, drinking and celebrating

We sure know how to wine and dine in Northern California and with ChefsGiving, everyone in the Bay Area now has the ability to do good while enjoying a good meal.  Michelin-starred chef Dominique Crenn is behind this week of special tasting menus at Bay Area restaurants and a Nov 19 gala fundraiser in San Francisco.  ChefsGiving’s goal is to raise money to help find temporary and permanent housing for fire victims.  “ChefsGiving Week” is Nov 13-19 and on Nov 19th join local chefs at the San Francisco Ferry Building for the final Chefsgiving benefit gala.  Click on the above link to find a Chefsgiving event near you.

 

 

 

ComfortComfortDrinks.net: Donate wine, beer, non-alcoholic beverages

It’s the little things…. to some out of the area it might seem trivial, but beverages are really (really!) important to so many of us in Wine Country.  We work and live in the drinks business and for so many folks, a key piece of getting “back to normal” is getting to enjoy a glass of something at the end of a long day.  Along with their homes, many folks also lost personal collections of precious local vintages. So many displaced people now don’t have the time, money or brain-space to  engage in those little acts of self-care like sharing a bottle of wine with family at dinner or making a special juice drink for their kids at Thanksgiving.  Hence, “Comfort Drinks”, a brainchild of Sonoma-based freelance writer and community leader Sarah Stierch.  By “Bringing bottles of joy to disaster victims”, Comfort Drinks links up fire survivors who have lost their homes with donations of wine, beer, non-alcoholic drinks and glasses, bar ware etc..  Email comfortdrinks@gmail.com or click on the link in the header above to make a donation.

 

Alison Crowe is the Director of Winemaking and a Partner at Plata Wine Partners in Napa and the Winemaker for Garnet Vineyards and Picket Fence Vineyards.  She is thankful this holiday season that her house and family survived the North Bay Wildfires intact and encourages everyone to give what and how they can this Thanksgiving.

Twitter/Instagram:  @alisoncrowewine

Mixed Feelings Alert: After the fires, Napa will largely be fine- it’s Sonoma that’s hurting

Though taken from the Napa side, this is looking west at the Nuns Fire raging largely in Sonoma County. Taken at Hwy 29 at Oak Knoll Ave on 10/10/17.

Though taken from the Napa side, this is looking west at the Nuns Fire raging largely in Sonoma County. Taken at Hwy 29 at Oak Knoll Ave on 10/10/17.

I originally posted the following on Facebook ten days ago, on 10/19/17 after reading an account of one Sonoma County resident’s evacuation during the first week of the fires.  Virginie Boone, Contributing Editor for Wine Enthusiast Magazine, lived through the Nuns/Oakmont Fire complex and her retelling of her family’s flight and, luckily, escape from the flames really brought home to me what was happening “over the hill” in Sonoma.

Though I live and have my office in the city of Napa, I work with a large number of vineyards and a small clutch of custom-crush wineries for my Garnet Vineyards and Picket Fence Vineyards brands in Sonoma.  Virginie’s harrowing tale of her experiences on the normally-bucolic Hwy 12 corridor near Kenwood left me in tears.  It also left me with a host of other feelings.

Hence, my original post below, typed on my iPhone, in the dark, but from the safety of my own home in Napa:
“Mixed feelings alert. Am I the only one that feels that, in the national and international news at least, “Napa” has seemed to get more of the attention than our neighboring counties during the North Bay firestorms? It’s probably in part because fewer people and reporters know where Santa Rosa, Kenwood, or Redwood Valley are. It’s also partly due to the fact that Napa got on the international marketing bandwagon back in the 1950’s and has been drumming it hard since then. What I would like my friends around the country and the world to know is that the wildfires in Napa county, where I live, were largely confined to the hills around the valley floor.

Sonoma County, however, suffered more fatalities and more structure loss and as many workers live in Sonoma and commute to Napa to work in the hospitality industry, I would wager more Sonoma County residents are going to be hurting for longer to get their lives back together.

Yes, more vineyards and wineries logged damage in Napa County and we also had tragic fatalities and harrowing tales of escape. I would never diminish anyone’s loss. A singed vineyard (I have two) and a burned winery outbuilding, however, are easy to report. Not so easy to count are the thousands of homeless and displaced, the bartender who lives on tips who hasn’t worked in 10 days, the undocumented vineyard worker who doesn’t know where to go or the housekeeper whose key clients are now also homeless.

I read Virginie Boone’s account of her family’s flight during the fire in the Kenwood area and, especially after witnessing the Sonoma-side destruction personally this week, realized the hurt and damage in Sonoma will run deeper, and probably for longer, than in many other places.

I had mixed feelings listening to the radio yesterday as some of my fellow Napa county members chimed in about their wineries being open for business while so many people, especially on the Sonoma side of the mountains, were still evacuated and the fires were still burning out of control. I understand that tourism is our life blood and we need to get the message out that restaurants, hotels and wineries are still standing and, indeed, are or will be open for business. It just felt like it was too soon to indulge in self-promotion.

I hope we can all find ways to continue to help each other across county lines in ways that I witnessed during this firestorm. Winemakers from Mendocino to Lodi to Carneros offered each other crush space in the face of power outages, friends opened their homes to each other and vineyard managers combing the hills of all affected counties kept us informed via social media as they kept their wary eyes on the skies. We all want to find ways to donate our time and our money as we claw our way through to recovery.

As we do this, I can’t help but reflect that the fires in Napa County largely chewed through forest and hillside acres and are now largely out. The fires in Sonoma, Lake and Mendocino County really ravaged neighborhoods and ripped apart the lives of so many people I know…and so many people I don’t. #707strong #winecountryfires #redwoodvalleyfire #sulphurfire”-Originally posted 10/19/17

In the last ten days we’ve learned the following sobering facts:   Napa County had about 500 structures burned.  Sonoma County had well over 5,000.  The City of Santa Rosa alone lost over 5% of its housing stock with occupancy rates hovering around 1%.  Think of what that 5% loss just did.

If you would like to donate your time or money to assist in the recovery effort, please click here to find out how:

North Bay Fires Donation List

The above list began as a Facebook post, grew to a Google doc and is now a stand alone website thanks to the tireless organizational efforts of freelance writer, Sarah Stierch, of Sonoma.

 

Alison Crowe is the Director of Winemaking for Napa-based Plata Wine Partners and makes Garnet Vineyards, Picket Fence Vineyards, Back From the Dead Red and many other branded and bespoke wine projects.

Email:  ancrowe@hotmail.com

Instagram and Twitter:  @alisoncrowewine

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Carneros Wine Alliance Hosting Bean-Bag-Toss Tournament and Tasting to Benefit Local Fire Department

Cornhole

Sat Aug 12 come try your hand (and tastebuds) at the Carneros Wine Tasting & Cornhole Tournament at Liana Estates in Carneros

Ever wanted to go head to head with a winemaker in a gripping bean bag tournament?  You’ll have your chance on Saturday, August 12 at Liana Estates.  The Carneros Wine Alliance is hosting an open-to-the-public event where you can hang out, taste wine and play Cornhole, the newest outdoor game to sweep wine country.

Tickets are $40 (purchase them here) and all proceeds go to the local Carneros and Schell-Vista Fire Department.

I got in touch with Carneros Wine Alliance Vice-Chair, and Schug Winery Marketing Coordinator, Crista Johnson, to find out more.

Q:  The Carneros Wine Alliance has held media and trade-only tastings in the past, but the Cornhole Tournament and Wine Tasting is the first public event the organization has held in a couple of years, right?

A:  “Correct. We are excited to connect with our customers, locals and tourists -and to help our local fire departments!”

(Read:  This is a unique and fun opportunity, so take advantage of all these great wines being in one place at one time in a gorgeous place.)

Q:  What can the public expect at this event?

A: The Carneros Cornhole Tournament and Wine Tasting will be a casual hangout at one of the finest wineries in Carneros and a friendly competition between the public and winemaking teams!”

(Read:  this will be a great chance to get down and dirty with your friends, and with Carneros winemakers (who might end up being your friends) on the playing field. Oh- and eat good food and drink great wine.)

Q:  What makes Carneros a fun/special/unique region to visit?

A:  “The casual atmosphere (while making some seriously good wines) and warm and friendly people.”

(Read:  You’re going to have fun and it’s going to be beautiful.  I would also add that it’s super-close to the Bay Area and easy to get to, about an hour from San Francisco and Sacramento, even closer to Oakland and the East Bay.  Liana Estates, one of Carnero’s newest coolest wineries to visit,  is located at 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa CA.)

Here are the details:  Carneros Cornhole Tournament & Wine Tasting

What:  Taste classic Carneros wines from Carneros Wine Alliance members Bouchaine, Cuvaison, Etude, Hyde, Liana Estates, Schug and Truchard and then compete against local winemakers in a Cornhole Tournament! All proceeds go to the Carneros & Schell-Vista Fire Department.

When:  Saturday, August 12 2017, 4-6 PM

Where:  Liana Estates, 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa CA

Tickets:  $40, buy them here, all proceeds go to the Carneros and Schell-Vista Fire Department

 

Alison Crowe is an award-winning winemaker, author and blogger based in Napa.  She is the Winemaker for Garnet Vineyards and Picket Fence Vineyards and is on the Advisory Board for the Carneros Wine Alliance.  @alisoncrowewine  ancrowe@hotmail.com

 

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A Barrel is Born: Part I

 

French chateaux, French food, French oak....the gardens of Versailles are traditional and timeless, much like French oak and winemaking.

French chateaux, French food, French oak….

Ah, La Belle France…..fine food, fashion, architecture and, of course, wine.  Talk to any winemaker, however, and their favorite French export is likely to be French oak.  Once just made into water-tight containers for storage and transport, French oak (along with a few other woods and nationalities, more on that later) has grown to become an integral part of the flavor and texture of many wines.

 

Not originally part of an ancient winemaking culture which relied on clay, stone or leather containers, wooden barrels have, over the centuries, made oak and wine a natural partnership. Oak’s capacity for bending and shaping, as well as its ubiquity in the forests of Northern Europe, ensured that as the wine trade grew in the Middle Ages, so did the use of oak barrels and casks in wine making.   In modern times, as winemakers have built upon and adapted those ancient traditions, wood has become, for many winemakers and wine drinkers, almost a taken-for-granted wine ingredient.  When wine comes in contact with oak it extracts flavor and aroma compounds as well as tannins from the wood, all of which can contribute to a wine’s complexity and longevity.  The barrel’s structure as well as the porosity of the wood create a unique aging environment that allows the transfer of tiny amounts of oxygen to the wine over time.

The French forestry industry officially got its start when Louis X1V began to "farm" oak trees for shipbuilding.

The French forestry industry officially got its start when Louis X1V began to “farm” oak trees for shipbuilding.

 

There’s a reason we rely mostly on oak in wine making and not pine, orange or cottonwood trees.  Oak is one of the few woods that can be cut, bent and crafted into a leak-proof container.  It also imparts largely pleasant flavor and aroma compounds; it’s easy to like the vanilla, butterscotch and spice notes that well-toasted (more on that later too!) oak can bring to a wine. Are some wines over-oaked and some winemakers too heavy-handed in their employment of what some have called “Medieval Tupperware”?  Absolutely.  In my winemaking approach I never rely on a recipe. Wines heavier in natural tannin and color can “handle” a little more oak whereas a Pinot Noir generally calls for less.  For me, wines like a Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Noir Rose never see any oak at all.  I let the intended wine style, and the wine itself, be my guide.

 

This June I was lucky enough to be invited to France by one of my barrel suppliers, Radoux, to witness first hand how one of our most beloved wine making tools gets from the forests of France into our cellars.  From acorn to tree, from tree to barrel and from barrel to finished wine, I and three other winemakers traversed France and Spain on our quest to get to the heart of what wood brings to wine.  We asked a million questions, drove what seemed about a million miles but also, as you might imagine, had a lot of fun.  The next few posts will detail my journey through the Loire, Bordeaux, Rioja and the Ribera del Duero as I learned about the art of growing and working with French oak.

Stacks of oak staves aging in the mill yard, a critical process for proper tannin and flavor development.

Stacks of oak staves aging in the mill yard, a critical process for proper tannin and flavor development.

 

Alison Crowe lives in Napa and is the Winemaker for Garnet Vineyards and Picket Fence Vineyards in addition to sundry other bespoke wine projects.  Girlandthegrape.com won “Best New Wine Blog” in the 2014 Wine Blog Awards.  Alison is also the author of The Winemaker’s Answer Book  , loves a good French flea market and has a particular fondness for Champagne.

Twitter and Instagram:  @alisoncrowewine

 

 

 

 

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A Winemaker Asks: What Does the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium Mean For You?

smalllogo

 

The annual Unified Wine & Grape Symposium is the largest wine trade show in the Western Hemisphere and for the last 23 years has attracted thousands of wine industry folks from around the world.  It was started in 1995 by two non-profit groups, the American Society for Enology & Viticulture (ASEV) and the California Association of Winegrape Growers (CAWG) as a way for the industry to keep up to date on information and technology.

This January over 14,000 winemakers, executives, grape growers, vineyard workers, consultants, marketing professionals and suppliers converged on the Sacramento Convention Center in what some have described as “The City’s Biggest Party”. Whether one comes for work, pleasure or a little of both, the Unified Symposium is the premier event for education and networking in the U.S. wine industry.

I stopped a few folks in the hallways to ask what they got out of this year’s event and what Unified means for them.  Here’s what they said:

 

Tim McDonald, of Wine Spoken Here PR and Ray Johnson, Executive Director of the Wine Business Institute

Tim McDonald of Wine Spoken Here PR (L) and Ray Johnson (R), Executive Director of the Wine Business Institute

Ray Johnson, Executive Director, Wine Business Institute, Sonoma State University

“It’s an opportunity to connect with the people who are making it happen in the wine industry.”

 

Tim McDonald, Chief Everything Officer, Wine Spoken Here Communications

“I have attended Unified from the start and this year was perhaps my favorite because of the outside-of-the box sessions! It started with a ‘bang’ when a wine journalist speaks about transparency and ingredient labeling. You have to be authentic and have to have a dialogue vs. a monologue with our consumers as well as empathy for them too. Learn, be inspired and most importantly, act! Plus I loved the berry to cannabis exploration… brilliant.”

 

 

Erica Moyer, Broker and Partner, Turrentine Wine Brokerage

Erica Moyer, Broker and Partner, Turrentine Wine Brokerage

 

 

Erica Moyer, Broker and Partner, Turrentine Brokerage

“Unified means being able to get together with friends, drink a little wine and eat good food.  Everyone seems to let their hair down a little.”

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Younger of Vino Farms and Pete Opatz of Silverado Investment Management Corporation

Chris Younger of Vino Farms (L) and Pete Opatz of Silverado Investment Management Corporation (R)

 

Pete Opatz, Vice President Vineyard Operations, Silverado Investment Management Corporation

“Going to the general sessions to get the trends and information is great, but seeing everybody is just as important.  Networking is right up there with content.”

Chris Younger, Vino Farms

“We come to see the technology on the exhibit floor and in the sessions. The State of the Industry talk is great- it’s interesting to see a wide perspective.”

 

 

 

 

Brant, North Carolina

Brant Burgiss, Thistle Meadow Winery, North Carolina

 

 

 

 

Brant Burgiss, Winemaker, Thistle Meadow Winery, North Carolina

“I come for the lectures and to see the vendors.  I wish there were more lectures in fact! Coming all the way from North Carolina was totally worth it.”

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Burch of Radoux Cooperage pours some oak trial wines for Unified attendees

Steve Burch of Radoux Cooperage pours some oak trial wines for Unified attendees

Steve Burch, Regional Sales Manager, Tonnellerie Radoux

“I look forward to the Unified Symposium every year to both catch up on emerging technology in the wine industry and catch up with relationships built over 20 years in the business.”

 

 

 

 

I think the Unified Symposium is our chance to learn, to be inspired and then to act.

I think the Unified Symposium is our chance to learn, to be inspired and then to act.

 

 

Learn, Act and Be Inspired

Part alumni reunion, part deep-dive into technology and trends, it’s our annual industry get-together and learning opportunity.  On Thursday morning, Amy Hoopes, President of Wente Vineyards lead a TED-style panel called “Adapt or go Extinct”.  “Let’s be curious and engage in that which is outside our own silos,”  she said.  “We need to learn, be inspired and act.”

The most important thing we can do after Unified is to act on what we’ve learned. Follow up with that supplier who could really impact your business in a positive way.  Jot down some ideas that inspired you. Write a thank-you note to someone who gave you some great coaching over coffee and shake the hand of a young first-timer.  You never know who you might teach and inspire, or what you might learn to move your business forward.

 

 

 

Did you attend the 2017 Unified?  Please tell us what Unified means to you by filling out our attendee survey form and session surveys:

http://www.unifiedsymposium.org/session/session-surveys

A big thanks to the staff and volunteers that make Unified Symposium possible- from the Sacramento Convention Center workers to the CAWG and ASEV boards to the Unified Symposium Program Committee and beyond.

Alison Crowe is an award-winning consulting winemaker and author based in the Napa Valley.  She is a member of the Program Committee for the Unified Wine & Grape Symposium.

Her wines (among many other wine projects):

www.garnetvineyards.com  www.picketfencevineyards.com

Her book:  The Winemaker’s Answer Book

Email:  ancrowe@hotmail.com

Twitter:  @alisoncrowewine

UW&GS and the UW&GS Logo are licensed trademarks of Unified Wine & Grape Symposium LLC

 

 

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Wet Feet? What the recent rains mean for North Coast vineyards

 

Chardonnay vines in Carneros after about 2 inches of rain. They drained out pretty quickly the next day.

Chardonnay vines in Carneros after about 2 inches of rain. They drained out pretty quickly the next day.

Friends and colleagues around the world have seen pictures of a very wet wine country in the media and many have contacted me wondering what the impact of all of these storms will be on grapevines.

Here’s what I posted on Facebook on Tuesday, January 11th after the first big storm (about 4.5 inches in 72 hours at our house in Napa) rolled through the area:

“Question: What do the recent rains mean for Napa and Sonoma grapes? I’ve seen pictures of flooded vineyards on the news and online.

Answer: Grapevines can tolerate flooding/”wet feet” for around 20 days. In fact, the French once used vineyard flooding to control the Phylloxera root pest. The recent Napa/Sonoma rains were acute (and did produce some “clickable” photos) but short lived. The few affected Napa valley floor vineyards I’ve seen this morning are draining out. Like everywhere else, the ground is saturated so you can bet everyone is going to be keeping an eye on trees, slopes and vineyard architecture (posts, trellises) to make sure we don’t have negative effects due to erosion and downed trees. I’m thrilled our vineyard reservoirs are full and that water tables are getting replenished- it bodes very well for the 2017 harvest.”

 

We are now facing another series of storm cells lined up off the Pacific Coast.  It started with yesterday’s (Wednesday, 1/18/17) wet and windy day and isn’t supposed to stop coming until this coming Monday.  The forecast is for around five inches to find its way into Napa and Sonoma Counties in as many days.

I predict that, once again, the news folks will be out snapping photos and shooting videos for their nightly newscasts.  Once again, we’ll be sharing our soggy vineyard pictures on Instagram and reacting with the Facebook “Wow!” button when we see the Conn Dam spillway back in action.

For water-starved Northern Californians, I have to admit it’s been pretty fun to be able to finally see creeks rise and reservoirs get full-to-bursting, even though of course we don’t want anyone to get hurt or suffer serious property damage.  The truth is, there will always be the low-lying areas (like poor Guerneville on the Russian River) that get waterlogged for a period of time.  We will always have those corners of our vineyards that get “wet feet” and dry out later than everywhere else.

Even if pruning has to be delayed a little bit in some places, there is still time to get the work done before bud-break in early March.  After years of drought and parched vines struggling under super-dry conditions, I’m happy to see this season’s turn-around. Because these acute periods of rain so far have been followed by at least a few days to dry out (we have at least six sunny days forecast starting Tuesday), many of us in the wine business have been saying, “Hey, we’ll take it!”  I’ll even take a few vineyard blocks with wet feet because, after all, that’s what’s “normal” for this time of year in Northern California.  For once, in an industry that increasingly values the rare and extreme, normal feels pretty good.

Alison Crowe is an award-winning winemaker, blogger and author who lives in the Napa Valley.

Her book:

The Winemaker’s Answer Book

Her wines:

www.garnetvineyards.com

www.picketfencevineyards.com

ancrowe@hotmail.com

 

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The Top 5 (non-liquid) Wine Things of 2016

Painter Penelope Moore and I about to collaborate (wine + oil painting) on a new work of art, one of my "Top 5 Cool (non-liquid) Wine Things of 2016

Painter Penelope Moore and I collaborate (wine + oil painting) on a new work of art.

Love it or hate it, 2016 brought us some very interesting things.  As a Winemaker, author, blogger and citizen of California “wine country” (I make vino from the Central Coast, and Napa and Sonoma Counties), it brought me into contact with some new friends, some new experiences and definitely some cool new things.

 

Many end-of-year posts are all about “Top X Wines of 2016”.  Here you will find no “Top Wines” as the best wines are the ones you best love to drink (mine is Champagne, by the way).  Below is simply a lovingly-collected compilation of treats, books, art and goodies from 2016 that are related to wine….and aren’t wine….which made me happy in 2016.

 

But First, Champagne

David White's But First, Champagne should be at the top of anyone's 2016 Must-Read list.

David White’s But First, Champagne should be at the top of anyone’s 2016 Must-Read list.

 

 

 

 

The title of David White’s new book about Champagne might as well be the first thing a dinner guest hears while walking through a winemaker’s door.  After a day of making Cabernet, the last think many of us want is a big glass of red. Except the drink being poured is as likely to be called “bubbles” since no winemaker would ever call domestic sparkling wine, no matter how renowned (vintage Schrammie, anyone?), “Champagne”.  That name is reserved for the French stuff alone.  That little factoid is one of the many in Mr. White’s book necessary for the newbie to know.  Rest assured, Champagne veterans will find plenty to capture their attention from the fascinating history of this renowned wine to the current producers and growers.  With sparkling wines and Champagne on a world-wide sales upswing, and with a paucity of good reads on this fascinating subject, But First, Champagne is a book whose time has come.  I predict White’s book will remain close at hand at my house for year-round reading and reference.  Because whether consumed in the shower (me, guilty) or whilst attending a shower, Champagne is always in season.

www.davidwhite.wine

 

McQuade’s Celtic Chutney

chutney2

McQuade’s Celtic Chutneys are one of my favorite things to pair with wine, cheese and a fresh baguette.

 

We do not eat enough chutney in the United States.  I was about to say, “around here” but in my kitchen, at least, we do approximate our annual chutney allocation because in 2016 I found the good stuff.  McQuade’s Celtic Chutney to be exact.  What’s Celtic about it you ask?  Well, it’s made by the delightful and delightfully very Scottish redhead, Alison McQuade, based around her Granny McQuade’s handwritten chutney recipes.  My favorite is the Fig & Ginger, which goes wonderfully with my Garnet Monterey Pinot Noir and Cowgirl Creamery’s Mt. Tam cheese.   Beyond the obvious cheese and wine pairing, I find myself dipping into a jar to serve with grilled pork chops or to dress up a simple sandwich.  McQuade’s Celtic Chutneys can be found in the Bay Area at the San Francisco Ferry Building Marketplace and Cowgirl Creamery in addition to restaurants and fine retailers in the area and or by contacting Alison at  mcquadechutneys@gmail.com.

 

 

The One Glass

The One red and white wine glass. Designed by world-renowned Master Sommelier Andrea Robinson may be the last line of wine glasses you'll ever buy.

The One red and white wine glass. Designed by world-renowned Master Sommelier Andrea Robinson they may be the last wine glasses you’ll ever buy.

A few months ago I was tasting some amazing Sardinian wines at Master Sommelier Andrea Robinson’s house and halfway through the first flight a guest’s wayward elbow launched a glass off the counter top.  Granted, the glass did fall on a thin kilim carpet laid over the kitchen tile but as I witnessed a small  bounce instead of a big smash, I was immediately impressed. In my house that wine glass would’ve been toast.  That was my introduction to The One Glass, a line of fine wine stemware created by Andrea and her husband John.  Andrea had been approached by several stemware companies looking to partner with her on a custom glass but she never found a product she was willing to get behind nor did she subscribe to the notion that you needed a different glass for every type of wine. As a busy wine professional and equally busy parent, Andrea decided to create her own universal white and red wine glass.  They had to meet her exacting design criteria while being affordable and (gasp!) dishwasher safe.  Like Andrea says, “Wine and wine glasses should not be complicated.”  I could not agree more.  Buy The One at Amazon here.

www.andreawine.com

 

Dana Confection Co.’s Calissons

Dana Confection Co. makes traditional calissons by hand in creative natural flavors like Black Currant Jasmine and Melon Blossom.

Dana Confection Co. makes traditional calissons by hand in creative natural flavors like Black Currant Jasmine and Melon Blossom.

Calissons are a traditional French sweet with a somewhat mysterious history.  Essentially a layer of crisp royal icing atop a paste of fruit (often melon) and almonds, no one exactly knows when they were first made or how they got their name.  I enjoyed them on a trip to the area around Aix-en-Provence a few years ago but up until recently hadn’t seen them since. Happily, in 2012, confectioner Rachel Dana discovered calissons while visiting the South of France and returned to her atelier in Brooklyn to perfect a domestic recipe for her fruit-based concoctions.  I love how the crunchiness of the icing gives way to a toothsome chewiness of bright fruit and almond paste.  Dana’s Black Currant Jasmine calisson has a dark-fruited depth of flavor lightened by a jasmine green tea-like freshness.  Not too sweet and intriguingly flavored (including Melon Blossom and Rhubarb Lavendar), Dana Confection Co’s calissons would be an elegant and unique part of a wine and cheese tasting or after-dinner cheese and fruit plate.

www.danaconfections.com

 

Penelope Moore’s Palette of the Palate Artwork

Painter Penelope Moore captures the flavors of Garnet Vineyards Pinot Noir, among other wines, in visual form in her "Palette of the Palate" work.

Painter Penelope Moore captures the flavors of Garnet Vineyards Pinot Noir, among other wines, in visual form in her “Palette of the Palate” work.

Winemaker Dinner where I get up and introduce a flight of my wines paired with the chef’s selections?  Ho hum.  Winemaker Dinner where an artist is painting a live interpretation of my wine on a huge canvas in front of the guests?  Now that’s a cool wine country experience.  Art and wine are oft-linked and glibly paired but as artist Penelope Moore and I discovered, both winemaking and oil painting do have a lot in common.  Using a given media (me: grapes, her: colored oils) we each use our skills and artistry to transform our raw material into a new creation.  I listen to the grapes and guide them to be the wine they were meant to become.  Penelope tasted my wine, in this case my Garnet Vineyards Rodgers Creek Pinot Noir, analyzed its aromas and flavors and then let them guide her color and layering choices to create an interpretation of the wine in oils.   Visit her website for a look at her visual interpretations of wine as well as her larger body of other beautiful and creative work.

www.penelopepaintings.com

 

These were my Top 5 (non-liquid) Wine Things of 2016.  Here’s to you and yours as we turn the page on one year and look forward to the next.  Cheers!

Alison Crowe is an award-winning winemaker, author and blogger and lives in Napa.

Her wine: www.garnetvineyards.com (among other projects)

Her book: The Winemaker’s Answer Book

Her contact info:  ancrowe@hotmail.com @alisoncrowewine

Sample reviews: Please email me at ancrowe@hotmail.com for sample submission or informational reviews.  I don’t do a ton of product reviews as this is largely an educational and personal wine blog (and my day job is being a winemaker) but if I take a fancy to your stuff like that of the folks above, I may talk about it!

2013 Garnet Vineyards Rodgers Creek Pinot Noir interpreted as an oil painting by artist Penelope Moore

2013 Garnet Vineyards Rodgers Creek Pinot Noir interpreted as an oil painting by artist Penelope Moore

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Home Grown: Wine Country Folks Share Local Holiday Gift Faves

gifts I know a lot of winemakers (takes one to know one, I guess).  I also know a lot of non wine biz folks which is one of the best parts about living in Napa Valley’s largest city.    Winemakers or not, what we all have in common is that we live in “Wine Country.” We also are particularly enthusiastic about the wonderful food, crafts and gifts grown, produced and designed right here in Napa and Sonoma Counties.

Below are some of our favorite locally-made holiday gift ideas from friends and neighbors we know and love. The good news is that you don’t have to live in wine country to enjoy their wares. Happy gift-giving, one and all, wherever you may call home!

(Important note:  NO freebies, samples or anything of value was received from any of the below businesses- these are my real favorite local gift picks so this is not paid content)

 

Steve Sando getting a look in on some of his famous beans.

Steve Sando getting a look in on some of his famous beans.

Heirloom Beans (and other goodies) From Rancho Gordo New World Specialty Foods

Beans? Yes, beans. If you’ve only ever eaten dessicated supermarket beans of questionable shelf life, prepare your taste buds for a treat. I’ve been a loyal customer of Steve Sando’s Rancho Gordo ever since we moved to Napa and his beans never fail to remind me of home, be that Napa or where I grew up in Santa Barbara County. My grandma always seemed to have a pot of pinto beans simmering on the stove and today they are still a key wintertime comfort food at our house.  Steve is a true American bean pioneer. His personal search for awesome dried beans (and more) lead him years ago to try growing his own and then to supporting small-volume Northern California and US farmers. Perhaps his most intriguing work is with the Rancho Gordo Xoxoc Project, a partnership with small Mexican farmers, which fosters the production of their indigenous foods like heirloom corn, prickly pears and of course, ancient varieties of beans. From beans to hand-made tortillas to spices and the odd vintage movie poster or three, Rancho Gordo is a wine country institution with global reach.

 

Olive and Poppy- I love the rings and bracelet made from pieces of wine barrels.

Olive and Poppy- I love the rings and bracelets made from oak barrels.

Jewelry and Thoughtful, Creative Gifts From Olive and Poppy

Several of my friends recommended I check out the super-cute creations of this dynamic Napa duo. I was immediately smitten with this cute-as-a-button wine barrel ring (see picture left). And since my next homesteading fantasy is to have a couple of beehives on our property down by the creek, I’ve found myself lusting after their honeycomb ring. Necklaces, scarves, tea towels, earrings….even cuff links for the man on your list. A lovingly-designed collection of well-curated pieces.

 

Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc from Napa's Oro Puro Vineyards is a rare handmade treat.

Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc from Napa’s Oro Puro Vineyards is a rare handmade treat.

Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc From Oro Puro Vineyards

Making true late-harvest botrytized white wine is a difficult feat in perfect-climate California. Most vintages, however, Deb and Jonathan Goldman manage to make it happen in their Sauvignon Blanc vineyard off of Silverado Trail just north of Napa. I love serving this wine with desserts, of course, but it is also amazing with cheese or dribbled on a summertime fresh salad of melons and mint. Order directly from co-owner Deb Freed Goldman for the goods. You’ll be so happy you did.

 

Candles from NapaScents make great hostess gifts.

Candles from NapaScents make great hostess gifts.

Soy candles from Napa Scents

Looking for something small but luxurious (and good for you and your home)?  These delightfully scented soy-based candles by local writer, blogger and personal fitness coach (yes, this mom does it all) Kristin Ranuio are a special treat. Soy wax, cotton wick, lovely array of scents, lots of sizes and even my favorite, the travel tin.

Free delivery for local orders over $50. Email: info@napascents.com, phone 707-299-0524.

 

 

Panettone, Truffles, Cheese etc., from Cheesemonger Doralice Handal

Doralice Handal knows how to throw down a cheese platter, as well as how to source hard-to-find Perigord truffles and exotic panettone flavors.

Doralice Handal knows how to throw down a cheese platter, as well as how to source hard-to-find Perigord truffles and exotic panettone flavors.

Call on Cheesemonger Extraordinaire Doralice Handal to help you find your favorite holiday goodies over the phone or email. She’s my go-to source for vintage chocolates, rare European vinegar, crazy-big panettone, black or white truffles (not the chocolate kind) and of course, cheese. You’re sure to find a cheese to please….ask Doralice for something to go with the aforementioned Oro Puro. Last day to place orders for delivery the week of Dec 15 is on December 12. Keep her info handy year-round….she’s one of our top secret sources for all things delish in Wine Country!

sharpandnutty@gmail.com  Instagram:  labodeguera

 

 

Wine Barrel Furniture and Home Goods from Buddha Barrels

I need about five of these Buddha Barrel spice racks in my kitchen....

I need about five of these Buddha Barrel spice racks in my kitchen….

I have so many favorite things on our friend Gwendolyn Larson’s online storefront it’s hard to focus. The pet bed! The pot rack! The magnetic spice rack! You can tell I’m excited about these hand-made home goods. This is the real wine-country wine barrel deal, folks. No mangy whiskey half-barrels mass-produced into things you can find in shopping malls. Buddha Barrels sources fine wine-soaked oak barrels from our neighboring wineries and lovingly realizes their functional and attractive designs right here in Napa.

 

 

Napa Valley Give Guide and Oakland Warehouse Fire Victim’s Fund

Tis the season to help those in need. We were so saddened by the recent warehouse fire tragedy in Oakland that I wanted to mention this new victim’s fund here. Funds go to pay medical and funeral expenses of survivors and victims. In addition, the Napa Valley Give Guide is your one-stop shop for giving. Choose your charity (Big Brothers Big Sisters?  Friends of the Napa River?  Sunrise Horse Rescue?) and make it happen for our community.

 

Enjoy this season of giving, my best holiday wishes to you and yours!

 

Alison Crowe is an award-winning winemaker, author and blogger.

Her wine: www.garnetvineyards.com (among other projects)

Her book: The Winemaker’s Answer Book

Her contact info:  ancrowe@hotmail.com @alisoncrowewine

All pictures above used with permission

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The Most Important Decision a Winemaker Will Ever Make (the answer might surprise you)

024From the number of times I’ve been asked the below questions while pouring for the public, you’d think they’d be the most important things I pay attention to when I make wine.

-“How many months of barrel age?”

-“Is this Chardonnay ML complete?”

-“Is this 100% Pinot?”

-“What’s the blend here?”

 

The problem is that the above, which get so much of the focus of sommeliers, wine critics and the public alike, are all a lot less important than one little thing:  when the grapes were picked.

 

As the rain pours down here in Napa (the second…or is it the third storm this October?) this is what is on the top of my mind regarding the end of Harvest 2016, and regarding quality winemaking in general.  I heard tales of some of our Napa Cab buyers wanting to hang their grapes not just through the first little rain we had at the beginning of October, but through the subsequent, much more significant event that brought almost an inch and a half mid-month.

You see, most Cabernet (and other loose-bunched varieties like Merlot) can generally ride out a little rain (say, less than 0.5 inch) with no problems, as long as it warms up afterwards.  Let your clusters sit out through more precipitation than that, however, and the berries can take up too much water, become diluted, breed rot and generally become tasteless mush.

As grapes ripen, sugar levels increase, puckery tannins lose their harshness, and green notes (hopefully) go away.  Naturally-present compounds like amino acids and other nutrients critical for yeast growth and healthy fermentations can start to decline while desirable “mature” flavor components are generally on the rise.

“Hangtime” doesn’t necessarily mean ripening time, however.  Time on the vine, in the face of cold weather or a canopy that’s shutting down with late-season senescence, doesn’t equate to real metabolic change within the grapevine or the grapes.   With a blind devotion to a certain amount of “hang time” in heat or dry weather, you’re only making raisins, not healthy grapes for delicious wine.  After two rainstorms, you’re toast, and definitely not of the tasty medium-plus barrelhead variety.

Choosing the perfect moment to pick is perhaps more of an art than a science.  We can use numbers (Brix, acidity, even phenolic data) as guidelines but the decision itself is a balance of a multitude of factors.  Sometimes nature gets in the way (2008 heat spike anyone?) or the wineries just get so plugged up there are no empty tanks (remember 2005?).  This year, the right call was to bring in your grapes before that second rainstorm.

I realize that the pick date is much, much harder for anyone else besides the winemaker and grower to put into proper context.  Each vintage, from AVA to AVA and often vineyard to vineyard, has its nuances.  In a sea of wines, it’s understandably difficult for consumers and the media to recognize the importance of picking Cabernet in Oakville on October 6 rather than October 16 2016.  Memorizing “18 months in French Oak” from a wine fact sheet is definitely an easier factoid to hold onto.

The importance of the pick date is one of the reasons I always say that once the grapes are picked, the path to wine is already laid before you.  Once you’ve committed to picking your Grenache at 22.5  Brix you’d better be making a rose because it’s never going to lend much to a full-bodied GSM blend.  Even if you picked your Oakville Cab on October 12 at 24.7 Brix it’s still going to be a better wine than one getting whipped around on a shut-down canopy after an inch and a half of rain.

So no, it’s not the fancy oak barrel, it’s not the soupçon of Rousanne you co-fermented your Syrah with, it’s not that 3% of whole cluster Pinot Noir in your open-top tank, no matter what your marketing department wants you to put on the website.  It’s something much more personal and something that should be closer to your heart and soul:  your wine’s birthday.

Once you pick, the path to wine is already laid out before you, immutable, unchangeable and excitingly full of possibilities.  The wine is already telling you what it wants to be and needs to be.  Your job is to pay attention and let it have its voice.

 

Alison Crowe is an award-winning Winemaker, blogger and author and lives in Napa.  She holds an MBA as well as degrees in Viticulture and Enology and Spanish from UC Davis.

ancrowe@hotmail.com

@alisoncrowewine

 

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